A Few Ways to Select a Tea

Select a tea by category, region, taste or TCM character

At TeaHong.com, we try to put ourselves in our customers’ shoes. Different people have different priorities. Each sees the world differently. Naturally when it comes to selecting a tea, your criteria may not be the same as that of any other tea drinkers. That is why we group our tea products in different ways so you can see them in the context that is closest to how you think when selecting a tea.

Selection by
Tea Category

Selection by
Tea Region

Selection by
Taste Preference

Selection by
TCM Character

Selection by Tea Category

The most common way to group different varieties of tea is by the category of processing method with which they are produced. Some call it Tea Classification, others Tea Categorisation. We think the later label is semantically more accurate.

Many connoisseurs and tea specialists organise their collections with this concept.

The above chart shows the five main categories: Green, Black, White, Pu’er ( Post-Fermentation ) and Oolong teas. Click the pie chart to browse the category of tea, click on your choice and enjoy the browse!

Need more info about a category before seeing the products? Here are some articles:

Our tea regions

Fenghuang / Phoenix

Tea picking in Wudong, Phoenix

Huangshan/ Anhui

Tea Regions of TeaHomg.com: Huangshan / Anhui

Minnan-Mindong, Fujian

Hakka village in Mindong, Fujian

Nepal, the Himalayas

Tea Regions of TeaHomg.com: Nepal / Himalayas

Taiwan

Tea garden on Alishan, Taiwan

Wuyi-shan

Tea Regions of TeaHomg.com: Wuyi

Yunnan

The Great Snow Peak in Yunnan

Zhejiang

Tranquil snow scene in West Lake, Hangzhou, Zhejiang

Selection by Taste

Teas are like raw gems. The true taste of each awaits the revelation made possible by the way you make it. Your personal need matters. It may change according to mood, time of the day, and occasions.

tasting

Tasting is the ultimate way to learn about a tea

Experience and explore

Begin by tasting a few selections using various infusion styles to gain more specialist understanding of the finesses and differences. Relate this with your personal preferences and you will gradually carve out a direction in building your own repertoire of tea. This will be your very own line that best suits your taste and your needs. With repeated usage your senses and perceptions will deepen. This will empower you with the connoisseur skill to easily master yet more varieties to continue to gain levels in the vast world of tea.

Selection by TCM Characters

This is for those who understand the needs of answering the voice of the body. A well customised and balanced collection not only helps to maximise tea’s health benefits, but also tea’s gastronomic qualities. At Tea Hong, we categorise our collection by traditional Chinese medicinal character.

Check out trending best sellers

If all these other ways of thinking about how to select a tea are not for you, perhaps you can see what other people are buying. These are some of what’s trending now:

Information on a tea page

Detail information on each tea page includes a description, taste profile, infusion tips and a few properties described with icons. This article gives a general orientation in case you want to prepare yourself before browsing.

Our Tea Master’s very own favourite oolongs

Our collection of various categories of teas is the best amongst peers. However, there is one category that we have an especially large and highly specialised offerings of — oolongs. Our tea master Leo Kwan is known to be particularly passionate about this range of tea. Here are some of his personal favourites:

by random order

Customer Reviews

Yet another way to get an idea is to see how other customers see our products. Read a few random reviews they have posted in this site, and click on the link to go to the product page:

  • Alishan Guanyin 2018

    Ask Yourself

    When seeking evenness of mind and a better disposition, ask yourself which tea might help you face the day with strength and calm. No tea may be more suited to the task than Alishan Guanyin.

    Nine grams of this beaded beauty produce a liquor the color of an orange-amber sunrise. The vessel lid offers the smell of warm vanilla and a refined perfume of iris, oak moss and cedar wood – a scent worthy of dabbing onto the skin.

    This tea whispers balance; its gentle steam patiently waiting to be inhaled. Ask, and Alishan will deliver perfectly even doses of quiet insight to both nostrils. A fresh morning breeze wafts over with subtle, smoldering hints of a distant bonfire.

    Next is a fleeting mouthful of sweet summer peaches dissolving into a slightly smoky, spicy-clean aftertaste balanced on the tip of the tongue, mid-palate and throat.

    Notice the transformation of the tiny, toasty tadpoles as they make a magical metamorphosis in your mug. They swell into wild, squiggly creatures of dark slate green. Balance gives way to spontaneity as these friendly, appealing leaf-beings inspire your free spirit. If you don’t believe me, ask them yourself.

    Karen Ager
  • Honey Orchid 2018

    2013 vs 2011

    Hello Sofina, this is a great question. No one can be 100% sure of how the 2013 will mature. However, given proper storage condition, we believe this stock will become a better tea in two year’s time than the 2011 batch now. We agree with you that there will be more tastes and thereby to mature into a fuller body and a mellowed down astringency. If you are interested in maturing this tea, we shall launch a new bigger pack size that will be more advantageous for maturing. Hopefully that’s before this batch is sold out. 😉

    Siu PB
  • Himalayan Finest Flowery

    Spicy, Bold. Direct

    Some teas are very subtle. Others are more bold. This is one of the latter types. The leaves have a spicy aroma that, like in the description conjure up memories of bergamot. The flavor is reminiscent of Breakfast style teas.

    Infused in a pot, it makes a good companion tea when you don’t mind something strong. I don’t recommend leaving the leaves in the vessel (gaiwan, pot or mug) for longer than required, however, as this can overbrew and become very strong.

    M.

    Michael Eversberg II
  • Meizhan Classic 2015

    My First Wuyi and What a Ride!

    Travel a scenic road and you never know what beauty awaits around the next bend. The same can be said of Meizhan Classic. It is full of surprises at every twist and turn. First, the dark and gnarly leaf sticks make music as they chime into the gaiwan. Water on the hotter side of Tea Hong’s suggested temperature range yielded a bouquet of violets growing on a wet forest floor.

    The fawn-colored liquor in a cha hai offered a second aroma: the promise of a ripe melon before it is cut. Tasting the tea gave yet another impression of chocolate mocha and clear quartz with linen-crisp notes that stayed at the juncture of the nose and throat – is it a smell or a taste or both?

    Subsequent infusions with slowly cooling water made Meizhan Classic a pure study in texture. Along with the faintest impression of field clover, this Wuyi delivered a joyride of round, buttery, creamy, silky indulgence. The journey ended with the pleasant appearance of the infused leaves, which unfurled into full, unbroken foliage accented with tinges of dark purple.

    Karen Ager