GABA Orange

GABA Orange

USD 19.80

Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Enriched:

There maybe a few other options of GABA tea out there, but to produce one that is fine tasting as well as certified organic requires real experience, dedication and stringent process management. Presenting GABA Orange from Nantou, Taiwan. Our answer to those of you wanting naturally formed GABA from a nice tasting oolong, with that touch of orange wonderfully developed in the tealeaves themselves. Nature always has surprises for us. We just have to work with it to make it happen. ( What is GABA? )

Maple SyrupTCM Neutral EnergyUSDA-Organic-SealEU-Organic-LogoGreat value!

Net weight: 120 g (4.2 oz) in Kraft-alu pack

In stock

000

南投有機精選 橙韻伽瑪烏龍

Taste profile

Soft, citric and yet woody and warm aroma with hints of bread and cinnamon. Smooth, sweet infusion with touches of hawthorn and tints of apple. Distinct accents of juice from a Xinhui orange — a Chinese variety native to Xinhua County in Guangdong, softly sweet with a unique floral subtly. Lightly sweet aftertaste with that same distinct citric bite. The taste profile of this tea is a little different from one’s perception of oolong or even tea in general. Expect a small surprise.

Infusion tips

Use a lower leaf amount to water ratio, say 1.5g to 200 ml to start with ( please note: tightly rolled tealeaves like this are heavier than they seem; use a scale to get yourself acquainted with the dry leaves first ) and infuse for longer, say 8 minutes. 95°C with top drop gives very pleasing result. This is not a tea for gongfu style, but rather an easy, relaxing drink throughout the day.

Additional information

Weight 250 g
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Reviews(1)

  1. Rated 5 out of 5

    Thirsty Pebbles

    What’s all this talk about Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)? I ordered this tea based on the lovely description of its taste and the tantalizing photo of the tea itself. I had no idea that the name refers to an oxygen-free, nitrogen-rich fermentation process that boosts levels of naturally occurring GABA. This compound is said to offer possible benefits to the central nervous system. Lord knows, my nervous system could use a gigantic chill-pill. But that’s not why I love this tea. Here’s why: The dry GABA nuggets offer up a heady aroma while the brewed tea’s color and flavor suggest apricot. It’s woody, not sweet. On the second infusion, the leaves plumped up so big, they almost lifted the lid off my gaiwan. I probably used too much tea and underestimated its penchant for water. That was my mistake, but a happy one. The transformation and the taste were both thoroughly enjoyable.

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